Policies and Plans

This group contains approved plans and policies being undertaken by your local Council effecting life across the island

Strategic Asset Management (previously Property Services) provides the corporate property function for the Isle of Wight Council. In short this comprises Asset Management (the strategic overview and direction of travel of the Council’s property assets), Estates Management (property acquisitions and disposals, rent renewals, lease renewals, valuations), Building Maintenance (reactive and planned maintenance and repair, energy management) and Building Design (major capital building projects, project management).

This Plan shows details of how the Council will reduce carbon emissions from its buildings and services by 6% per year.

This policy provides rules for the retention and destruction of council records.  It also provides guidance for staff with respect to the effective management of information.








This document sets out the objectives of the Island’s economic development plan for the next three years: 2011/12 to 2013/14. It outlines targets to be achieved to meet the vision for the Island by 2020 but also the progress that needs to be achieved in the shorter term.

This study, carried out by Grontmij, shows heat demand density across the Island for both existing and proposed development. It suggests those areas where district heating could effectively be deployed in the future.

Fire and Rescue Service Strategic Integrated Risk Management Plan - 2009/14

Consultation paper for the Fire and Rescue Service IRMP 2014-20.

Second draft

An Assessment of the Economic and Environmental Impacts of the 2008 Isle of Wight Music Festival.

Local Authorities are required under the Childcare Act 2006, Section 6 to ensure that there is sufficient, quality, flexible, sustainable childcare for parents and carers The Childcare Act 2006 defines childcare sufficiency as ‘sufficient to meet the requirement of parents in the (Local Authority’s) area who require childcare in order to enable them:

 

a) To take up or remain in work

b) To undertake education or training which could reasonably be expected to assist them to obtain work.

c) May have regard to any childcare which they expect to be available outside their area.

 

In order to meet the sufficiency duty local authorities are required to undertake a detailed assessment of the supply of, and demand for, childcare in their area. Qa Research was commissioned to undertake the Childcare Sufficiency Assessment on behalf of the Local Authority. The assessment included research and consultation with parents / carers, children and young people, employers, and providers.

 

This document presents the key findings of the assessment in line with nine indicators of sufficiency:

 

  • Sufficiency of Places
  • Range of Provision
  • Quality
  • Flexibility
  • Accessibility (geographical issues)
  • Knowledge and Information
  • Affordability
  • Inclusivity/Meeting Particular Needs
  • Sustainability

The Child Poverty Act 2010 enshrined in law the commitment to eradicate child poverty in the UK by 2020 and placed a duty on local authorities to:

•work with relevant agencies and named partners such as: Police, transport authorities, Primary Care Trust, Job Centre Plus - to reduce and mitigate the effects of poverty;

•prepare and publish a local Child Poverty Needs Assessment - to understand the drivers of child poverty and characteristics of those living in poverty;

•prepare and publish a Joint Child Poverty Needs Strategy - setting out the measures the Local Authority and named partners propose to take to reduce and mitigate the effects of child poverty

 

The Needs Assessment:

•will provide evidence and context for developing a strategic approach to child poverty by providing a deeper understanding of:

•the extent and distribution of child poverty on the Isle of Wight;

•the key drivers and characteristics of families living in poverty;

•the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats to tackling child poverty

 

This organisational chart shows the children's safeguarding structure with direct reporting lines to commissioning managers within the Community Wellbeing and Social Care directorate.

This document lays out what the fostering service can expect from foster carers and vice versa.

This report reflects the importance that the Isle of Wight Council gives to ensuring that its children in public care are safe, cared for and achieving well.

The Local Council Tax Support Section 13A Policy.  This policy sets out how the scheme will operate and what the qualifying conditions are for making awards from April 2013 to replace Council Tax Benefit

The Local Council Tax Support Vulnerability Policy provides a statement of intent of how the Council will address the issues of Child Poverty, The chronically sick and disabled, the Armed Forces Covenant, and work incentives through the Local Council Tax Support Section 13A Policy

The Local Government Finance Bill 2012 and the Rating (Property in Common Occupation) and Council Tax (Empty Dwellings) Act 2018 amend the Local Government Finance Act 1992 allowing local discretion over the implementation of certain discounts and charges applied within the Council Tax regime.   The changes in legislation require the Council to determine the levels of discounts in respect of second homes, dwellings which are unoccupied and substantially unfurnished and dwellings which are unoccupied, substantially unfurnished and in need of repair.  Section 11 Policy

Additional enforcement policy guidance on the residential use of holiday parks - approved September 2009

This document sets out the policy for residents wishing to obtain assistance with their household waste and recycling collections

A policy to guide staff on how to deal with those customers who exhibit unacceptable behaviour. Criteria and process for applying the policy and carrying out reviews.

The Discretionary Housing Payments (DHP) scheme may provide support where there is a shortfall between rental liability and payment of Housing Benefit, provided that the claimant is entitled to at least the minimum amount of Housing Benefit and an application for further financial help is made and accepted.  

The Local Council Tax Support Section 13A Policy (LCTS).  This policy sets out how the scheme will operate and what the qualifying conditions are for making awards from April 2014.  This replaces the previous LCTS scheme applied from April 2013 to March 2014.

The purpose of this procedure is to ensure that all staff working within the department are aware of their roles and responsibilities in respect of work to safeguard children.

The anti-social case review process or also known as the community trigger is a mechanism for victims of persistent anti-social behaviour to require action, starting with a review of their case. The focus of a review is on bringing agencies together to share information and to take a more joined up, problem-solving approach to find a solution for the victim. Agencies including councils, the police, local health teams and registered providers of social housing will have a duty to undertake a case review when someone requests one and their case meets the defined threshold. For the purpose of the anti-social case review process, anti-social behaviour is defined as “behaviour causing harassment, alarm or distress to any member of the public”.

To enable the Deputyship Department of the Council to support people with mental disorders who are deemed incapable of looking after their own financial affairs by Medical Professionals and give assistance on dealing with property and financial affairs.

The Deputyship Department will act in the best interests of the client at all times and provide high quality individual management of their financial and legal affairs, which will be unique in every individual case.

This policy sets the framework for delivery of Advocacy Services on the island. It is intended to support adult social care and health staff in their person-centred practice and to secure personalised outcomes by helping individuals, their families, friends and/or carers to:


·             speak up for, or act on behalf of, themselves or another person.
·             take action to say what they want, secure their rights, represent their interests.
·             contribute their views, opinions, ideas and feelings to inform processes for continuous service improvement.

This is a calculator for financial contributions towards affordable housing through the planning process. This accompanies the consultation draft Affordable Housing Supplementary Planning Document (SPD) and allows developers to calculate the cost of meeting this requirement.

This policy outlines the Isle of Wight Council’s arrangements for the operation of the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS). DoLS were an amendment to the MCA 2005 and came into effect in April 2009.

DoLS:

1)           Provides legal protection for those vulnerable people who are, or may become, deprived of their liberty within the meaning of Article 5 of the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) in a hospital or care home;

2)           Helps to identify when a person who lacks mental capacity to consent be deprived of their liberty and ensures that deprivation of liberty is lawful and provide an Appeals Process.

Section 117 of the Mental Health Act places a joint duty on health and social care to provide support to patients who are discharged from longer term detention under the Mental Health Act, to reduce the risk of their readmission to hospital.

This After-care Policy – Section 117 of the Mental Health Act provides guidance to staff in both the Isle of Wight NHS Trust and the Isle of Wight Council on the discharge of this duty, including clarification of their responsibilities, the range of services to be provided, monitoring and review and when the duty may come to an end.

A policy for the Planning Enforcement section of Planning Services

Ordinary residence is one of the key tests which must be met to establish whether a local authority is required to meet a person’s eligible needs. The test for ordinary residence applies differently in relation to adults with needs for care and support and carers. For adults with care and support needs, the local authority in which the adult is ordinarily resident will be responsible for meeting their eligible needs. For carers, however, the responsible local authority will be the one where the adult for whom they care is ordinarily resident. This is an important point to note, particularly if the carer provides care for more than one person in different local authority areas.

Ordinary residence can be acquired as soon as the person moves to an area, if their move is voluntary and for settled purposes. This is irrespective of whether they own, or have an interest in a property in another area.

The purpose of guardianship is to enable patients to receive care in the community when it cannot be provided without the use of compulsory powers. It provides an authoritative framework for working with a patient to keep him/her safe whilst achieving as independent a life as possible. Where it is used it must be part of the patient’s overall care and treatment plan.

Guardianship is focussed on social care needs and the patient’s welfare. If the need for compulsory powers is primarily in relation to medical treatment Supervised Community Treatment, if available, may be more appropriate.

Disability Facility Grant Policy Document  - outlining eligibility and processes.

The Exceptional Hardship Fund (EHF) has been set up by the Council to assist applicants for Council Tax Reduction who are facing 'exceptional hardship'

Where a person is liable to pay council tax, the Isle of Wight Council has powers to reduce liability in relation to individual cases or class(es) that it may determine and where national discounts and exemption cannot be applied.  The council will consider using its powers for any council tax payer in exceptional circumstances, where there is evidence of financial hardship or personal circumstances that justify a reduction in council tax liability.































































































































There are financial implications to awarding any discounts other than those currently available under statutory legislation and the financial burden of Section 13a discounts has to be met through an increase in the general level of council tax for other payers.

NT46 DM Modification Request - location map, to be linked to DMMO register

This poster sets out what recycling goes in each bin

Option 1 Case Study 1 - Reducing the maximum level of CTR support from 80% to eiother 75% or 70%

Option 1 Case Study 2 Reducing the maximum levle of CTR support from 80% to either 75% or 70%

Option 1 Case Study 3 Reducing the maximum level of CTR support from 80-% to either 75% or 70%

Option 1 Case Study 4 Reducing the maximum level of CTR support from 80% to either 75% or 70%

Option 1 Case Study 5 Reducing the maximum level of CTR support from 80% to either 75% or 70%

Option 2 Case Study 1 Reduce the period for which a person can be absent from Great Britain and still receive CTR from 13 weeks to 4 weeks (this will bring the Council Tax Reduction Scheme in line with the changes in Housing Benefit announcement by Central Government)

Option 3 Case Study 1 Remove the element of a Work Related Activity Component in the calculation of the current scheme for new Employment Support Allowance claimants (it is proposed that the Council's Council Tax Reduction Scheme is amended primarily to reflect the changes to mirror the changes in Housing Benefit)

Option 3 Case Study 2 Remove the element of a Work Related Activity Component in the calculation of the current scheme for new Employment Support Allowance claimants (it is proposed that the Council's Council Tax Reduction Scheme is amended primarily to reflect the changes to mirror the changes in Housing Benefit)

Option 4 Case Study 1. To limit the number of dependant children within the calculation of CTR to a maximum of two for any new children born on or after 1 April 2017 (this will bring the Council Tax Reduction Scheme in line with changes being introduced by Central Government to Universal Credit, Tax Credits and Housing Benefit)

Option 4 Cse Study 1To limit the number of dependant children within the calculation of CTR to a maximum of two for any new children born on or after 1 April 2017 (this will bring the Council Tax Reduction Scheme in line with changes being introduced by Central Government to Universal Credit, tax credits and Housing Benefit)

Option 4 Case Study 3. To limit the number of dependant children within the calculation of CTR to a maximum of two for any new children born on or after 1 April 2017 (this will bring the Council Tax Reduction Scheme in line with changes being introduced by Central Government to Universal Credit, tax credits and Housing Benefit)

Option 5 Case Study 1.  To remove entitlement to the Severe Disability Premium where another person is paid Universal Credit (Carers Element), (this will bring the Council Tax Reduction Scheme in line with the changes in Housing Benefit announched by Central Government in April 2017)

Option 5 Case Study 2.  To remove entitlement to the Severe Disability Premium where another person is paid Universal Credit (Carers Element), (this will bring the Council Tax Reduction Scheme in line with the changes in Housing Benefit announched by Central Government in April 2017

To set a minimum level of CTR support at £2 per week.  Option 7 Case Study 1

To set a minimum level of CTR support at £2 per week.  Option 7 Case Study 2

To set a minimum level of CTR support at £2 per week.  Option 7 Case Study 3

This policy clarifies the Isle of Wight council’s (IWC) position regarding respite care and the sustainability of providing a carer’s service. A carer is an individual who provides or intends to provide care for another adult. This excludes paid carers and volunteers. The IWC recognise it is important that carers have regular breaks from caring and have time to themselves, even if it is just for an hour or so. Carers play a significant role in preventing the needs for care and support for the people they care for, which is why it is important the IWC supports carers in their role and help them to look after their own health and wellbeing.

The Care Act 2014 (sections 34 and 35) requires local authorities to offer Deferred Payments Agreements to allow persons to defer the sale of their home where it is needed to fund care fees. The Care and Support (Deferred Payment) Regulations 2014 set out the legal framework and local authorities responsibilities in greater detail. The new legal duties are effective from 1 April 2015.

The regulations require local authorities to offer deferred payments to people meeting certain eligibility criteria (see section 7 below). These agreements can be retained until the person passes away (with the amount repayable from their estate) but can also be offered to persons who decide to sell their home whilst still alive (the deferred payment providing “bridging finance”).

The Discretionary Housing Payments (DHP) scheme may provide support where there is a shortfall between rental liability and payment of Housing Benefit, provided that the claimant is entitled to at least the minimum amount of Housing Benefit and an application for further financial help is made and accepted

This completed EIA sets out the review considerations in providing the final Council Tax Support scheme options for the financial year 2017/18 for the Full Council decision of 18.1.17 to provide a scheme from 1 April 2017. 

This completed EIA sets out the review considerations in providing Council Tax  discounts in relation to empty homes, those undergoing structural alteration and repair, and long term empty properties from 1 April 2017 to support the Council decision of 18.1.17 to provide a revised policy during 2017/18. 

Map showing 6 key regeneration sites as part of the new regeneration programme

The Policy explains a Direct Payment Personal Budget is the amount of money the Isle of Wight Council (IWC) has assessed is necessary to meet an individual’s eligible social care needs and can be delivered in a variety of ways. A direct payment gives the individual choice and control over how their eligible needs are met, including purchasing and arranging assistance or services for things that are important in their life. It allows them to use the funds to achieve the outcomes identified in the agreed Independence Plan.

The Third Party Top Up Policy explains all about top up payments. Top Ups are the extra money needed to be paid by a third party to meet the difference between the amount the IWC will pay (as identified in the social care personal budget) and the money the provider requires for the placement.

Sometimes a provider will request a more expensive price for a placement than the Isle of Wight council (IWC) has identified it will meet as agreed in the personal budget.

The Isle of Wight Council is asking for people's views on changing its Non-Residential Care Charging Policy for people who receive adult social care. We are considering including disability benefit income at the higher or enhanced rate as part of the financial means test when we levy charges on people.

The attached are 3 examples of how these may affect you.

A forecasting mechanism to give an indication of the numbers of children who are potentially eligible for the 30 hour offer. NB It is NOT a guarantee.

This document sets out the Councils planning policies, and was adopted in March 2012. The document includes strategic policies relating to land use (including Waste and Minerals) and development management policies. It is used when determining planning applications.

The Isle of Wight Council has the powers to grant discretionary rate relief to any premises that meet specific criteria in accordance with legislation.  This policy provides details of the discretionary reliefs available and the EU requirements including provisions for State Aid and the details for the day to day management of discretionary reliefs.

The Government announced a temporary new relief scheme for public houses for 2017-18 only, that have a rateable value of below £100,000. Under the scheme, eligible public houses will receive a £1000 discount on their bill. The relief will have effect for 2017/18.

 

A discretionary rate relief application for £1,500 business rates discount for office space occupied by local newspapers, up to a maximum of one discount per local newspaper title and per hereditament, and up to state aid limits, for 2 years from 1st April 2017.

This is a temporary measure to support local newspapers adapt to technological changes within the industry. The relief is intended to be specifically for local newspapers and will be delivered through local authority discretionary discount powers (under

You can get small business rate relief if:

  • your property’s rateable value is less than £15,000
  • your business only uses one property - you may still be able to get relief if you use more

If you use more than one property, when you get a second property, you’ll keep getting any existing relief on your main property for 12 months.

You can still get small business rate relief on your main property after this if both the following apply:

  • none of your other properties have a rateable value above £2,899
  • the total rateable value of all your properties is less than £20,000 (£28,000 in London)

This is the Equality Impact Assessment related to the Pharmaceutical Needs Assessment 2018-20.

To be completed by people who wish to make a comment or compliment about an Adult Social Care service or member of staff.

Guidance revised January 2020 which reflects feedback form work undertaken on potential schemes

The Local Council Tax Support Section 13A Policy.  This policy sets out how the scheme will operate and what the qualifying conditions are for making awards from April 2016 to replace Council Tax Benefit

There are a number of local organisations available that can provide you with the help and support you need. This Factsheet helps to provide access points to some of these local organisations.

This Factsheet is intended to help anyone who needs information on direct payments.

This Factsheet provides information to anyone who requires information on charging and paying for Adult Social Care Services

This Factsheet is intended to help anyone who needs information on carers.

This Guide provides information on making a comment, compliment or complaint about the council or any of their Adult Social Care staff.

You can use this form if you disagree with an assessment of your adult social care needs, or finances, or a decision taken.

This Factsheet is intended to help anyone who needs information on residential care.

This Factsheet is intended to help anyone who needs information on Supported Living.

The purpose of this policy is to explain the way in which the Isle of Wight Council (IWC) commissions its services by using a Dynamic Purchasing System. The Dynamic Purchasing System (DPS) is based on a web-based system called sproc.net which is hosted and managed by a third party provider called adam. Sproc.net enables the IWC to commission home support, day and evening opportunities, domestic care to supported living and learning disability care home services on an individual basis.

 

For the purpose of this policy, a Supplier is the term used to refer to a provider who enters into an agreement to provide services on behalf of the IWC.  

This policy explains the Isle of Wight council’s (IWC) position regarding the time period up to receiving a Court Order for safeguarding properties of adults being cared for away from home as identified in the Care Act 2014.

The framework will be followed by all professionals responsible for carrying out the protection of property as a delegated duty on the council’s behalf and ensures the council complies with legislation. 

If someone is being cared for away from their home, for example they are in hospital or temporarily supported in a care home and they are unable to make arrangements themselves or arrange for someone else to protect and secure their property, contents or pets, the IWC will take reasonable steps identified in Section 5.3 to protect their property, contents and pets. The council’s duty to protect the property ends when the person returns home, or when they are able to make their own arrangements for the protection of their property. The council will recover from the person all reasonable expenses incurred in protecting their property.

A joint plan between the IWC, IOW NHS Trust, IOW CCG and People Matter IW for the delivery of providing support to adults with a learning disability.

A joint plan between the IWC, IOW NHS Trust, IOW CCG and People Matter IW for the delivery of providing support to adults with a learning disability. Easy read version

The Pharmaceutical Needs Assessment (PNA) for the Isle of Wight was produced in accordance with statutory requirements set out in the National Health Service (Pharmaceutical and Local Pharmaceutical Services) Regulations 2013.

The PNA is a statement of the needs of the Island’s population in relation to pharmaceutical services, and since April 2013, Health and Wellbeing boards (HWBs) have been responsible for publishing and updating their local PNA.

The PNA takes account of the strategic context of the Joint Strategic Needs Assessment (JSNA). This is an assessment of the population’s health and wellbeing needs, based on demographic, health and care data as well as current service provision.

Health and wellbeing strategy for the Isle of Wight 2018-2021

This strategy builds on the aim of the council’s corporate plan to move towards one public service by

developing joint commissioning across council departments and the wider NHS, regeneration and

environmental system, and in doing so to start looking beyond integration itself to the outcomes it

produces to improve the wider determinants of health and wellbeing.

A robust and transparent assessment of settlement coalescence sensitivity on the Island. To help Council to identify potential for further development around key settlements.

This easy read Factsheet provides information on making a compliment, comment or complaint about Adult Social Care.

A Personal Education Plan for Looked After Children in a Post-16 education setting.

Many individuals currently supported by the council receive services in a residential or nursing care setting. Their needs have been agreed with them as a result of an assessment of need for care and support.

The council will require the individual to make a financial contribution subject to their ability to pay and this policy covers these circumstances.

In 2017 Portsmouth, Southampton, Gosport and Isle of Wight councils came together to adopt a partnership approach to delivering the covenant within the Solent region of the wider County of Hampshire. Entitled Strengthening Local Covenant delivery, the aim of this partnership is to:

Raise awareness among serving personnel, reservists and veterans of the support they can expect from local authorities;

Provide a broader understanding of the needs of the local veteran population as well as serving personnel during transition to civilian life;Evaluate the impact of these initiatives.

The Solent Armed Forces Covenant Partnership Board representing Portsmouth, Southampton and Gosport, and the Isle of Wight Civil Military Partnership Boards, refreshed in 2017, provides strategic governance for local delivery of the Covenant.
We estimate that 76,207 adults and children are part of the Solent Armed Forces community. The Solent Armed Forces Covenant Partnership have worked together to understand the needs of this community in the form of the Solent Armed Forces Needs Assessment

The Beaulieu House Statement of Purpose describes how and where they provide a home and short breaks for disabled children.

A personal assistant (PA) is someone who provides personal and practical support to help individuals live the life they choose. PAs support people to promote independence and will be involved in many aspects of their employer’s life in the home, at leisure or at work.

The Isle of Wight Council (IWC) are committed to support people already working as a PA and encourage others who wish to become a PA. The policy provides information, advice and signposts anyone wishing to employ a PA or become a PA.

 

 

This protocol supports any home or home support provider closure and will be supported by the Commissioning team in Adult Social Care.

The Direct Payment Support Service Team are an in-house account manager service. They administer payments to the providers of your care and support on behalf of any adult in receipt of a Direct Payment Personal Budget and in accordance with their agreed Wellbeing Agreement (identifies what outcomes you want to achieve and the support you may need as a result).

The Exceptional Hardship Fund (EHF) has been set up by the Council to assist applicants for Council Tax Reduction who are facing 'exceptional hardship'

In care and support, quality starts from what matters most to enable people to live their lives in the way that they want. By definition, there can be no ‘one size fits all’.  Getting the right balance for people can only be achieved through a person-centred approach which understands someone’s personal history, current circumstances, future aspirations and what is important to them. This may change over time so it is important not to make assumptions.

This policy sets out how the Isle of Wight Council meets its statutory obligations in relation to direct payments. It explains how the council manages direct payments and services on behalf of individuals. Council business and practice refers to Managed Accounts as a Direct Payment Support Service.

Under the Care Act 2014 the Isle of Wight Council has a duty to assess and focus on promoting your wellbeing. This means helping you achieve the things that matter to you in your life. We will do as much as possible to help you maintain, regain or increase your independence and be as active as possible.

The policy sets out the individual’s right to refuse assessment as well as the eligibility and assessment process and criteria. The policy also defines the scope of the council’s responsibility to those who do not meet the eligibility criteria.  

This policy applies not only to people who are eligible to receive funded social care and support but to their family, carers and people who pay for their own care.

 

In 2017, following a local authority funding competition, the Isle of Wight Council was awarded £1.35m from the
Access Fund by the Department for Transport, to fund delivery of the three-year ‘Transforming Travel on the
Isle of Wight: Transition to Transformation’ programme.

The Smarter Choice Consultancy Ltd. and Lorax Environmental Associates have been commissioned by Isle of Wight Council to independently evaluate the Transforming Travel programme. They have worked with individual projects to advise on best practice in data collection, and are using the data subsequently collected by the projects to assess Transforming Travel’s outcomes.

Following a programme of engagement and co-production with people on the Isle of Wight who have a sensory impairment or who care for someone with a sensory impairment, this report outlines the key themes and trends which were detailed in the responses received.

4LSAB Multi-agency Safeguarding Policy, Guidance and Toolkit produced by the Safeguarding Adults Board.

4LSAB Multi-agency Guidance on Allegations Management produced by the Safeguarding Adults Board.

4LSAB Multi-Agency Escalation Policy produced by the Safeguarding Adults Board

Frequently asked questions (FAQs) regarding the current West Wight School Place Planning consultation.

The Isle of Wight Council is authorised to accept Housing Benefit claims that have been completed electronically through the use of our approved electronic form.

The Isle of Wight Council is authorised to accept Housing Benefit claims that have been completed electronically through the use of our approved electronic form.

This document outlines the IWC values and expected behaviours for staff and leaders across the organisation.



It is to be used in conjunction with the People Performance Management guidance to help managers to have regular discussions with their staff about performance and behaviour.

Minutes from the public meeting/drop-in session held as part of the West Wight Schools Consultation on Wednesday 13 March 2019 at All Saints' CE Primary School. 

Factsheet that explains the council's service for looking after your personal budget, arranging your care and making payments in accordance with your Wellbeing Plan.

Final meeting minutes from the public meeting/drop-in session held on Monday 1 April 2019 at St Saviour's Catholic Primary School, as part of the West Wight School Places consultation.

The purpose of the public facing document is to reassure the public that effective plans are in place to manage the effect of the Festival on the local community.

The current premises licence for the Isle of Wight Festival.

Each year the council must decide whether to change the Local Council Tax Support (LCTS) Scheme for working age applicants in its area.

 

The changes will only affect working age claimants who currently receive LCTS or who may apply in the future.

 

The locally-agreed changes we are consulting upon do not affect people of pension age. The LCTS rules for these claimants are set nationally by the government.

An aspiration to see the introduction of electric cargo bike delivery services was included as part of the Isle of Wight Council’s successful Access Fund bid to the Department for Transport in 2016. Funding from the Access Fund has been earmarked to “pump prime” the introduction of such an operation on the Isle of Wight in 2019-20.

The electric cargo bike project is part of a wider ‘Cycle Service Delivery’ approach which also includes a project exploring how cycles can facilitate journeys made by organisations providing domiciliary care.

This is a copy of the application that was submitted to the Department for Transport in 2016 as a bid for the Access Fund for Sustainable Travel Revenue Competition. 

This bid was successful and this is now a document that provides guidance about the purpose and origins of this project. 

The bid headline description is as follows: 
We will deliver an ambitious programme of travel behaviour change through proven partnerships with the education, business and tourism sectors, securing 133 FTE jobs, saving 3442 tonnes of CO2, removing 23.4m private car kms, and generating a net increase of 1.17m walking and 832k cycling trips over the three-year Access Fund implementation period. Our objectives are to:
Work with tourism businesses to grow the value of the visitor economy, and embed active travel into visitor experiences;
Normalise walking and cycling to work and transform access to employment opportunities for jobseekers and apprentices;
Improve the health and wellbeing of young people and their families through education and community engagement



This Factsheet is intended to help anyone who needs information on Deferred Payments.

Public notice dated 19.07.2019 regarding closure of All Saints' Church of England Primary School and temporary enlargement of Yarmouth Church of England Primary School, Isle of Wight.

Isle of Wight Council is the Waste Collection Authority (WCA) and Waste Disposal Authority (WDA) for the Isle of Wight. The overall aim of the Council is to provide accessible, efficient, and sustainable waste services to Island residents, at an affordable cost.

This Policy documents operational principles that represent current practice of waste services on the Isle of Wight.

Terms and Conditions for Collection Plus waste service - updated September 2019

A summary of the intended work to be completed at St Mary's junction between 30 September and 20 December.

Press release announcing the start date of phases 1-4 of the St Mary's junction improvement scheme.

Press release announcing start date of phases 1-4 of the St Mary's junction improvements.

The Isle of Wight Health and Care Plan is a shared vision between the NHS and the local authority to empower people to live more independently.

Frequently Asked Questions for the St Mary's junction improvement scheme.

Illustration showing all planned, or completed, junction improvements in Newport as part of Newport Strategic Junction Improvement programme.

Press release about the St Mary's junction improvements public information evening on 17 October 2019.

Overview maps showing traffic arrangements during first four phases of St Mary's roundabout improvement scheme.

Consultation results on reinstatement of Undercliff Drive to vehicular traffic - September 2019.

Public Notice consultation on the proposed closure of All Saints' Church of England Primary School, Freshwater.

Press release detailing phase 3 works at St Mary's junction - 1 November 2019.

Simplified maps showing the traffic management arrangements for the first four phases of the St Mary's Junction Improvement scheme.

Southbound - towards Newport - traffic management arrangements at St Mary's roundabout, from January 2020.

A press release issued in December 2019 providing an update on the improvements works at St Mary's roundabout.

Traffic management map for St Mary's roundabout from April until June 2020.

The Exceptional Hardship Fund (EHF) has been set up by the Council to assist applicants for Council Tax Reduction who are facing 'exceptional hardship'

The policy establishes the level of service considered appropriate in dealing with the Building Regulations in order to achieve reasonable standards of Health and Safety and to ensure that a Local Authority's duties and liabilities under the Building Act and Building Regulations are adequately fulfilled, by determining what a Local Authority Building Control (LABC) Working Policy should be and how the details of that Policy may be achieved.

In line with the next phase of the UK’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Isle of Wight Council (IWC) is required to review and update the Local Outbreak Plan. This 2021 update plan details how the Council and its partners will respond to further outbreaks of infection and covers the key aspects.

 

Report by Hardisty Jones on behalf of Isle of Wight Council.

Clear articulation of the economic opportunity of the Medina Valley

Identification of market failure(s) hindering the realisation of economic potential

Identifying a programme of interventions to maximise opportunity and address challenges and

market failures.

The Isle of Wight Council’s Handling Medications in a Residential Care Setting Policy forms an essential part of local health and care systems risk and medicines management strategy. The policy provides guidance to all residential care home workers involved in the care and support of adults living in residential care setting and it will be reviewed on an annual basis. The IWC have an internal practice guideline that supports this policy and employees in practice in residential care settings.































The national Council Tax Benefit (CTB) scheme ended 31 March 2013 and was replaced by a locally determined system of Council Tax Support (CTS).  The funding made available by the Government for the new scheme was reduced initially by 10% nationally and cash limited with further reductions each year expected through the financial settlement.  The aim of the support scheme is to provide financial assistance to council taxpayers who have low incomes.  Persons who are of state pension credit qualifying age are protected under the scheme in that the calculation of the support they are to receive has been set by Central Government.  For working age applicants however the support they receive on the Isle of Wight is to be determined by the Council.

The Annual Report 2019-20 is a chance to discover a summary of the council's activity during the past year (April 2019 to March 2020) and learn how we are working together to provide a financially balanced and sustainable council on behalf of the Isle of Wight Community.

T&Cs for van permit scheme used at the household waste recycling centres

It is the Isle of Wight Council’s aim to undertake a fair and transparent approach to the removal of vehicles and these guidelines outline the removal of vehicles parked in contravention of on-street parking restrictions to a secure vehicle storage facility.

The Domestic Abuse forum sets out the action plan annually

Suicide Postvention Protocol for schools and colleges - to support educational establishments to develop their own postvention plan and to provide support if a suspected death by suicide, has occurred (pupil or teaching staff). 

The document explains more about the background to this project, and its significance in the context of the wider regeneration aspirations for Ryde, the project outline and the specific elements that we would like people's feedback on as part of this consultation.

A list of frequently asked questions for the Ryde Interchange project. This will be updated during the course of the project.

A press release detailing the launch of the Ryde Interchange consultation.

The Island Planning Strategy (IPS) is used to guide development on the island over the next 15 years. The plan is developed by ourselves in consultation with the local community. It will deal with future needs and opportunities in relation to:

Notes and attachments from the Local Access Forum (LAF) meeting 13/05/21

Habitats Regulations Assessment (HRA) of its emerging Island Planning Strategy

A report that considers air quality impacts from increased vehicle emissions associated with proposed development on the Isle of Wight. It forms part of the evidence base supporting the revised Island Planning Strategy.

Updated framework on the reporting and monitoring of key performance information

PERSISTENT ANTI-SOCIAL BEHAVIOUR CASE REVIEW POLICY (COMMUNITY TRIGGER)

Part of the Isle of Wight Shoreline Management Plan 2, Adopted by the Isle of Wight Council in December 2010.
Map showing a summary of the adopted SMP Policies.  View as part of the SMP Main Report.

Part of the Isle of Wight Shoreline Management Plan 2, Adopted by the Isle of Wight Council in December 2010.
Main Report, Chapters 1 to 3 (of 6).  View as part of the whole SMP Main Report and Appendices.

Part of the Isle of Wight Shoreline Management Plan 2, Adopted by the Isle of Wight Council in December 2010.
Main Report, Chapter 4.1 - Introduction to SMP policy development (of 6 chapters). 
View as part of the whole SMP Main Report and Appendices.

Part of the Isle of Wight Shoreline Management Plan 2, Adopted by the Isle of Wight Council in December 2010.
Main Report, Chapter 4.2 - Policies for Cowes and the Medina Estuary (zone 1). 
View as part of the whole SMP Main Report and Appendices.

Part of the Isle of Wight Shoreline Management Plan 2, Adopted by the Isle of Wight Council in December 2010.
Main Report, Chapter 4.3 - Policies for Ryde and the North-east coastline (zone 2). 
View as part of the whole SMP Main Report and Appendices.

Part of the Isle of Wight Shoreline Management Plan 2, Adopted by the Isle of Wight Council in December 2010.
Main Report, Chapter 4.4 - Policies for Bembridge and Sandown Bay (zone 3). 
View as part of the whole SMP Main Report and Appendices.

Part of the Isle of Wight Shoreline Management Plan 2, Adopted by the Isle of Wight Council in December 2010.
Main Report, Chapter 4.5 - Policies for Ventnor and the Undercliff (zone 4). 
View as part of the whole SMP Main Report and Appendices.

Part of the Isle of Wight Shoreline Management Plan 2, Adopted by the Isle of Wight Council in December 2010.
Main Report, Chapter 4.6 - Policies for the South-west coast (zone 5). 
View as part of the whole SMP Main Report and Appendices.

Part of the Isle of Wight Shoreline Management Plan 2, Adopted by the Isle of Wight Council in December 2010.
Main Report, Chapter 4.7 - Policies for the West Wight (zone 6). 
View as part of the whole SMP Main Report and Appendices.

Part of the Isle of Wight Shoreline Management Plan 2, Adopted by the Isle of Wight Council in December 2010.
Main Report, Chapter 4.8 - Policies for the North-west coast (zone 7). 
View as part of the whole SMP Main Report and Appendices.

Part of the Isle of Wight Shoreline Management Plan 2, Adopted by the Isle of Wight Council in December 2010.
Main Report, Chapters 5 and 6 (of 6) -Policy Summary and Action Plan. 
View as part of the whole SMP Main Report and Appendices.

The Exceptional Hardship Fund (EHF) has been set up by the Council to assist applicants for Council Tax Reduction who are facing 'exceptional hardship'.  This is the final policy for the year 2022/2023

Since April 2013 every health and wellbeing board in England has a legal responsibility to publish and keep up to date a statement of the needs for pharmaceutical services of the population in its area, referred to as a pharmaceutical needs assessment (PNA). The PNA looks at existing provision of community pharmacy services across the Isle of Wight, whether this meets the current and future needs of the population and identifies any gaps in current or future provision.

Some segments of the population may have specific needs in relation to pharmaceutical
services and these are examined in this document.

We are delighted to launch this strategy which sets out our joint vision for improving dementia services and making the Isle of Wight a place where people with dementia can live safe and fulfilling lives.

Dementia is fast becoming the UK’s largest health and social care challenge. It is likely that at some point dementia will touch the lives of each and every one of us in some way and that experience will be lasting, as it is for each and every person in our local community.

Dementia is a condition that has a significant impact not only on our local people but on the services delivered by health, social care and the community and voluntary sector as evidenced by the Isle of Wight Dementia Stocktake undertaken in 2019 as
part of the development work for this strategy.