Document Library A to Z


Documents beginning with the letter 'A'

In common with all other local authorities in the UK the Isle of Wight Council has developed an Agenda
21 Strategy for the Island. The purpose of an Agenda 21 Strategy is to bring social, environmental and
economic well-being to us all at the same time as ensuring that we leave the world at least as good a
place as we found it.

The Isle of Wight Council (“the council”) is committed to promoting open and

transparent governance. This policy facilitates the efficient, effective and

strategic use of council’s information to deliver its corporate objectives. This

policy will be reviewed periodically, to ensure it reflects any changes to

existing legislation and incorporates any new legislation.

A good practice guide for building accessibility into Isle of Wight Council communications.

Guidance for staff only.

This study considers the potential for anarobic digestion on the Island, reviewing available waste streams and the size of AD system this could support.

The Isle of Wight Armed Forces Community Covenant is a is a pledge made between the Island’s civilian community and the armed forces. It aims to prevent those who serve or have served in the armed forces, and their families, from being disadvantaged by their service to their country, and to develop a better understanding between the civilian community and the armed forces community on the Isle of Wight. The armed forces community is regarded as being serving personnel, veterans (both Regular and Reservist) and their dependants, including merchant navy who have been involved in military operations.

“Advocacy is taking action to help people say what they want, secure their rights, represent their interests and obtain services they need. Advocates and advocacy schemes work in partnership with the people they support and take their side. Advocacy promotes social inclusion, equality and social justice.” (The Advocacy Charter, 2002)

From 1st April 2015 the Care Act places a statutory duty on all local authorities to involve people in decisions made about them and their care and support, for people to be active partners in the key care and support processes of assessment, care and support planning, reviews and safeguarding. No matter how complex a person’s needs, local authorities are required to help people express their wishes and feelings, support them in weighing up their options, and assist them in making their own decisions.

This policy sets the framework for delivery of Advocacy Services on the island. It is intended to support adult social care and health staff in their person-centred practice and to secure personalised outcomes by helping individuals, their families, friends and/or carers to:

·             speak up for, or act on behalf of, themselves or another person.
·             take action to say what they want, secure their rights, represent their interests.
·             contribute their views, opinions, ideas and feelings to inform processes for continuous service improvement.

This policy sets the framework for delivery of Advocacy Services on the island. It is intended to support adult social care and health staff in their person-centred practice and to secure personalised outcomes by helping individuals, their families, friends and/or carers to:


·             speak up for, or act on behalf of, themselves or another person.
·             take action to say what they want, secure their rights, represent their interests.
·             contribute their views, opinions, ideas and feelings to inform processes for continuous service improvement.

This is a calculator for financial contributions towards affordable housing through the planning process. This accompanies the consultation draft Affordable Housing Supplementary Planning Document (SPD) and allows developers to calculate the cost of meeting this requirement.

This policy outlines the Isle of Wight Council’s arrangements for the operation of the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS). DoLS were an amendment to the MCA 2005 which came into effect in April 2009. The Policy is also Care Act 2014 compliant.

DoLS provides a framework to:

 1)            The deprivation of liberty safeguards provide legal protection for those vulnerable people who are, or may become, deprived of their liberty within the meaning of Article 5 of the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) in a hospital or care home;

2)           To help to identify when a person who lacks mental capacity to consent to it, is deprived of their liberty to ensure that any deprivation of liberty is lawful and provide an Appeals Process.

 

This policy outlines the Isle of Wight Council’s arrangements for the operation of the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS). DoLS were an amendment to the MCA 2005 and came into effect in April 2009.

DoLS:

1)           Provides legal protection for those vulnerable people who are, or may become, deprived of their liberty within the meaning of Article 5 of the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) in a hospital or care home;

2)           Helps to identify when a person who lacks mental capacity to consent be deprived of their liberty and ensures that deprivation of liberty is lawful and provide an Appeals Process.

Section 117 of the Mental Health Act places a joint duty on health and social care to provide support to patients who are discharged from longer term detention under the Mental Health Act, to reduce the risk of their readmission to hospital.

This After-care Policy – Section 117 of the Mental Health Act provides guidance to staff in both the Isle of Wight NHS Trust and the Isle of Wight Council on the discharge of this duty, including clarification of their responsibilities, the range of services to be provided, monitoring and review and when the duty may come to an end.

Section 117 of the Mental Health Act places a joint duty on health and social care to provide support to patients who are discharged from longer term detention under the Mental Health Act, to reduce the risk of their readmission to hospital.

This After-care Policy – Section 117 of the Mental Health Act provides guidance to staff in both the Isle of Wight NHS Trust and the Isle of Wight Council on the discharge of this duty, including clarification of their responsibilities, the range of services to be provided, monitoring and review and when the duty may come to an end.

Ordinary residence is one of the key tests which must be met to establish whether a local authority is required to meet a person’s eligible needs. The test for ordinary residence applies differently in relation to adults with needs for care and support and carers. For adults with care and support needs, the local authority in which the adult is ordinarily resident will be responsible for meeting their eligible needs. For carers, however, the responsible local authority will be the one where the adult for whom they care is ordinarily resident. This is an important point to note, particularly if the carer provides care for more than one person in different local authority areas.

Ordinary residence can be acquired as soon as the person moves to an area, if their move is voluntary and for settled purposes. This is irrespective of whether they own, or have an interest in a property in another area.

The purpose of guardianship is to enable patients to receive care in the community when it cannot be provided without the use of compulsory powers. It provides an authoritative framework for working with a patient to keep him/her safe whilst achieving as independent a life as possible. Where it is used it must be part of the patient’s overall care and treatment plan.

Guardianship is focussed on social care needs and the patient’s welfare. If the need for compulsory powers is primarily in relation to medical treatment Supervised Community Treatment, if available, may be more appropriate.

The purpose of guardianship is to enable patients to receive care in the community when it cannot be provided without the use of compulsory powers. It provides an authoritative framework for working with a patient to keep him/her safe whilst achieving as independent a life as possible. Where it is used it must be part of the patient’s overall care and treatment plan.

Guardianship is focussed on social care needs and the patient’s welfare. If the need for compulsory powers is primarily in relation to medical treatment Supervised Community Treatment, if available, may be more appropriate.

Disability Facility Grant Policy Document  - outlining eligibility and processes.

A guide for young people, families and other professionals to gain a basic understanding of how Children's Services work.

A guide to help younger people understand what happens when Children's Services are invovled with a family.

The policy recognises that carers can be eligible for support in their own right and the valuable role they play in our local community. The guidance explains the importance that carers have regular breaks from caring and have time to themselves, even if it is just for a short time. It explains in detail how the council supports carers in their caring role and the assessment process to confirm they have eligible needs. Any service identified will be financially assessed.

The policy explains the various kinds of respite care available and gives guidance to Adult Social Care workers.

This policy clarifies the Isle of Wight council’s (IWC) position regarding respite care and the sustainability of providing a carer’s service. A carer is an individual who provides or intends to provide care for another adult. This excludes paid carers and volunteers. The IWC recognise it is important that carers have regular breaks from caring and have time to themselves, even if it is just for an hour or so. Carers play a significant role in preventing the needs for care and support for the people they care for, which is why it is important the IWC supports carers in their role and help them to look after their own health and wellbeing.

The Care Act 2014 (sections 34 and 35) requires local authorities to offer Deferred Payments Agreements to allow persons to defer the sale of their home where it is needed to fund care fees. The Care and Support (Deferred Payment) Regulations 2014 set out the legal framework and local authorities responsibilities in greater detail. The new legal duties are effective from 1 April 2015.

The regulations require local authorities to offer deferred payments to people meeting certain eligibility criteria (see section 7 below). These agreements can be retained until the person passes away (with the amount repayable from their estate) but can also be offered to persons who decide to sell their home whilst still alive (the deferred payment providing “bridging finance”).

The Policy explains a Direct Payment Personal Budget is the amount of money the Isle of Wight Council (IWC) has assessed is necessary to meet an individual’s eligible social care needs and can be delivered in a variety of ways. A direct payment gives the individual choice and control over how their eligible needs are met, including purchasing and arranging assistance or services for things that are important in their life. It allows them to use the funds to achieve the outcomes identified in the agreed Independence Plan.

The Third Party Top Up Policy explains all about top up payments. Top Ups are the extra money needed to be paid by a third party to meet the difference between the amount the IWC will pay (as identified in the social care personal budget) and the money the provider requires for the placement.







Sometimes a provider will request a more expensive price for a placement than the Isle of Wight council (IWC) has identified it will meet as agreed in the personal budget.

The Isle of Wight Council is asking for people's views on changing its Non-Residential Care Charging Policy for people who receive adult social care. We are considering including disability benefit income at the higher or enhanced rate as part of the financial means test when we levy charges on people.

The attached are 3 examples of how these may affect you.

The Government announced a temporary new relief scheme for public houses for 2017-18 only, that have a rateable value of below £100,000. Under the scheme, eligible public houses will receive a £1000 discount on their bill. The relief will have effect for 2017/18.

 

A discretionary rate relief application for £1,500 business rates discount for office space occupied by local newspapers, up to a maximum of one discount per local newspaper title and per hereditament, and up to state aid limits, for 2 years from 1st April 2017.

This is a temporary measure to support local newspapers adapt to technological changes within the industry. The relief is intended to be specifically for local newspapers and will be delivered through local authority discretionary discount powers (under

You can get small business rate relief if:

  • your property’s rateable value is less than £15,000
  • your business only uses one property - you may still be able to get relief if you use more

If you use more than one property, when you get a second property, you’ll keep getting any existing relief on your main property for 12 months.

You can still get small business rate relief on your main property after this if both the following apply:

  • none of your other properties have a rateable value above £2,899
  • the total rateable value of all your properties is less than £20,000 (£28,000 in London)

To be completed by people who wish to make a comment or compliment about an Adult Social Care service or member of staff.

You may be in a position where you need information, advice or guidance on how best to support yourself to live as independently as possible and/or continue in your caring role.

Whether this happens in your own home or you need support, we can help you identify the most suitable type of care to meet your needs.

If you need help to live independently in your own home we may be able to help you. We will discuss with you the most suitable type of aids, adaptations, telecare, care and support that is available.



This Factsheet is intended to help anyone who needs this kind of help and support.

 

There are a number of local organisations available that can provide you with the help and support you need. This Factsheet helps to provide access points to some of these local organisations.

You may be in a position where you need information, advice or guidance on how best to support yourself to live as independently as possible and/or continue in your caring role.

Whether this happens in your own home or you need support, we can help you identify the most suitable type of care to meet your needs.

If you need help to live independently in your own home we may be able to help you. We will discuss with you the most suitable type of aids, adaptations, telecare, care and support that is available.

This Factsheet is intended to help anyone who needs information on direct payments.

This Factsheet provides information to anyone who requires information on charging and paying for Adult Social Care Services

This Factsheet is intended to help anyone who needs information on carers.

This Guide provides information on making a comment, compliment or complaint about the council or any of their Adult Social Care staff.

You can use this form if you disagree with an assessment of your adult social care needs, or finances, or a decision taken about your Wellbeing Plan.

This Factsheet is intended to help anyone who needs information on residential care.

This Factsheet is intended to help anyone who needs information on Supported Living.

This Factsheet is intended to help anyone who needs information on funding their own care (self-funders).

This policy explains how the Isle of Wight Council (IWC) investigates and manages Adult Social Care complaints, what clients can do if they are unhappy about any aspect of Adult Social Care Services and what the IWC will do to resolve the complaint. This policy is aimed at good practice guidance and supporting staff to deal with complaints in ways which are demonstrably consistent and fair and which comply with legislation and best practice.

The IWC are concerned about the quality of care clients receive, and are always striving to maintain high standards of social care with continuous review of everything we do. However, we know there may be times when people are not satisfied with the standard of service they receive.

A Market Position Statement is a tool which provides information for providers and users (and their carers) of health and social care services. It is intended to help providers:
·         make decisions about whether and how to invest in services on the Island

·         develop further opportunities for those receiving health and / or care and support using personal budgets

·         understand the future needs of people living on the Island and the predicted impacts on the demand for services

This policy explains the Isle of Wight council’s (IWC) position regarding the time period up to receiving a Court Order for safeguarding properties of adults being cared for away from home as identified in the Care Act 2014.

The framework will be followed by all professionals responsible for carrying out the protection of property as a delegated duty on the council’s behalf and ensures the council complies with legislation. 

If someone is being cared for away from their home, for example they are in hospital or temporarily supported in a care home and they are unable to make arrangements themselves or arrange for someone else to protect and secure their property, contents or pets, the IWC will take reasonable steps identified in Section 5.3 to protect their property, contents and pets. The council’s duty to protect the property ends when the person returns home, or when they are able to make their own arrangements for the protection of their property. The council will recover from the person all reasonable expenses incurred in protecting their property.

The policy clarifies the Isle of Wight council’s (IWC) position regarding the time period up to receiving a Court Order for safeguarding properties of adults being cared for away from home as identified in the Care Act 2014.

If someone is being cared for away from their home, for example they are in hospital

or temporarily supported in a care home, and they are unable to make arrangements themselves or arrange for someone else to protect and secure their property contents or pets, the IWC will take reasonable steps identified in Section 5.3 of the Policy to protect their property, contents and pets. The council’s duty to protect the property ends when the person returns home, or when they are able to make their own arrangements for the protection of their property. The council will recover from the person all reasonable expenses incurred in protecting their property.

A joint plan between the IWC, IOW NHS Trust, IOW CCG and People Matter IW for the delivery of providing support to adults with a learning disability.

A joint plan between the IWC, IOW NHS Trust, IOW CCG and People Matter IW for the delivery of providing support to adults with a learning disability. Easy read version

Under the General Data Protection Regulation, and related data protection legislation, individuals are entitled to access personal data that is held by the council about them.  Requests should be in writing and clearly identify what information they wish to access, eg. detailing the council department/s and time periods.  This form has been created to assist individuals in submitting requests.

This annual report presents a summary of the council’s activity during the past year (April 2017 to March 2018); a year in which we launched our corporate plan and made a commitment to our vision, for: “The Isle of Wight to be an inspiring place in which to grow up, work, live, and visit."

A3055 - Undercliff Drive Impact study prepared by the International Centre for Tourism and Hospitality Research and the Market Research Group at Bournemouth University, December 2017. 

The Isle of Wight Council commissioned Bournemouth University to assess the effect of the A3055 Undercliff Drive road closure on local businesses.

This easy read Factsheet provides information on making a compliment, comment or complaint about Adult Social Care.

Many individuals currently supported by the council receive services in a residential or nursing care setting. Their needs have been agreed with them as a result of an assessment of need for care and support.

The council will require the individual to make a financial contribution subject to their ability to pay and this policy covers these circumstances.

A personal assistant (PA)/carer is someone who provides personal and practical support to help individuals live the life they choose. PAs support people to promote independence and will be involved in many aspects of their employer’s life in the home, at leisure or at work.

The Isle of Wight Council (IWC) are committed to support individuals already working as a PA and encourage people who wish to become a PA. The policy provides information, advice and signposts anyone wishing to employ a PA.

 

 

The Isle of Wight Council (IWC) are committed to support individuals already working as a PA and encourage and support people who wish to become a PA. The policy also provides information, advice and signposts anyone wishing to employ a PA. The council wanted to create a community PA Noticeboard that supports PA’s delivering care that helps people in the community.

Developing the PA market enables people requiring assistance and support better access PA’s across the island thereby improving choice, control and quality of support.

 


This protocol supports any home or home support provider closure and will be supported by the Commissioning team in Adult Social Care.

The Direct Payment Support Service Team are an in-house account manager service. They administer payments to the providers of your care and support on behalf of any adult in receipt of a Direct Payment Personal Budget and in accordance with their agreed Wellbeing Agreement (identifies what outcomes you want to achieve and the support you may need as a result).

In care and support, quality starts from what matters most to enable people to live their lives in the way that they want. By definition, there can be no ‘one size fits all’.  Getting the right balance for people can only be achieved through a person-centred approach which understands someone’s personal history, current circumstances, future aspirations and what is important to them. This may change over time so it is important not to make assumptions.

This policy sets out how the Isle of Wight Council meets its statutory obligations in relation to direct payments. It explains how the council manages direct payments and services on behalf of individuals. Council business and practice refers to Managed Accounts as a Direct Payment Support Service.

Under the Care Act 2014 the Isle of Wight Council has a duty to assess and focus on promoting your wellbeing. This means helping you achieve the things that matter to you in your life. We will do as much as possible to help you maintain, regain or increase your independence and be as active as possible.

The policy sets out the individual’s right to refuse assessment as well as the eligibility and assessment process and criteria. The policy also defines the scope of the council’s responsibility to those who do not meet the eligibility criteria.  

This policy applies not only to people who are eligible to receive funded social care and support but to their family, carers and people who pay for their own care.

 

Factsheet that explains the council's service for looking after your personal budget, arranging your care and making payments in accordance with your Wellbeing Plan.

This is a copy of the application that was submitted to the Department for Transport in 2016 as a bid for the Access Fund for Sustainable Travel Revenue Competition. 

This bid was successful and this is now a document that provides guidance about the purpose and origins of this project. 

The bid headline description is as follows: 
We will deliver an ambitious programme of travel behaviour change through proven partnerships with the education, business and tourism sectors, securing 133 FTE jobs, saving 3442 tonnes of CO2, removing 23.4m private car kms, and generating a net increase of 1.17m walking and 832k cycling trips over the three-year Access Fund implementation period. Our objectives are to:
Work with tourism businesses to grow the value of the visitor economy, and embed active travel into visitor experiences;
Normalise walking and cycling to work and transform access to employment opportunities for jobseekers and apprentices;
Improve the health and wellbeing of young people and their families through education and community engagement



This Factsheet is intended to help anyone who needs information on Deferred Payments.

The annual report 2018-19 is a chance to discover a summary of the council’s activity during the past year (April 2018 to March 2019) and learn how we are working together to provide a financially balanced and sustainable council on behalf of the Isle of Wight community.

Overview maps showing traffic arrangements during first four phases of St Mary's roundabout improvement scheme.

Description of what the Access to Home Team role is in Adult Social Care.

To be completed by anyone who would like to submit a complaint about an Adult Social Care service or member of staff.

Form to be completed when requesting for a property to be transferred from Council Tax to Business Rates

Transforming Travel on the Isle of Wight: Transition to Transformation.

Sustainable Transport Access Fund programme evaluation 2018/19

This Factsheet is intended to help anyone who needs information on Third Party Top Ups.















Residential homes and respite units adhere to the Intimate Care Protocol to deliver personal care.

The Isle of Wight Council’s Handling Medications in a Residential Care Setting Policy forms an essential part of local health and care systems risk and medicines management strategy. The policy provides guidance to all residential care home workers involved in the care and support of adults living in residential care setting and it will be reviewed on an annual basis. The IWC have an internal practice guideline that supports this policy and employees in practice in residential care settings.































This leaflet is to provide you with some information about what Reablement is, how we aim to work with you, through to supporting your return home to remain living independently.

The Annual Report 2019-20 is a chance to discover a summary of the council's activity during the past year (April 2019 to March 2020) and learn how we are working together to provide a financially balanced and sustainable council on behalf of the Isle of Wight Community.

As a contractual requirement form the Education and Skills Funding Agency, the Adult Community Learning Service must publish details of any fees and charges it makes on any part of subcontracted programmes of adult learning.

This support guide is to help provide informal carers with assistance and guidance to access support for themselves and the people who they are supporting during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Isle of Wight Council’s Adult Community Learning Service has published a new Grant Funding Prospectus for the 2021/22 Academic Year.

Bids are invited for grant-funding worth up to £40,000 from voluntary and community groups, as well as any enterprise that will use funding to deliver services that widen access to adult learning opportunities.


Analysis of Household Income and Housing Affordability on the Isle of Wight

A report that considers air quality impacts from increased vehicle emissions associated with proposed development on the Isle of Wight. It forms part of the evidence base supporting the revised Island Planning Strategy.

Many individuals currently supported by the council receive services agreed with them as a result of an assessment of need for care and support where a local authority arranges care and support to meet a person’s needs, it may charge the adult. This new framework is intended to make charging fairer and more clearly understood by everyone.

The council will require individuals to make a financial contribution subject to their ability to pay and this policy covers these circumstances.

The policy has been written according to the Care Act 2014 and subsequent issue of the Care and Support Statutory Guidance and Regulations.

Many individuals currently supported by the council receive services agreed with them as a result of an assessment of need for care and support where a local authority arranges care and support to meet a person’s needs, it may charge the adult. This new framework is intended to make charging fairer and more clearly understood by everyone.

The council will require individuals to make a financial contribution subject to their ability to pay and this policy covers these circumstances.

The policy has been written according to the Care Act 2014 and subsequent issue of the Care and Support Statutory Guidance and Regulations.

This policy forms an essential part of local health and care systems risk and medicines management strategy. The policy provides guidance to all Bed Based Reablement home workers involved in the care and support of adults living in Bed Based Reablement setting and it will be reviewed on an annual basis. The Practice Guidelines support the Handling of Medication in a Bed Based Reablement Setting Policy and reflects good practice guidance and legal requirements and applies to all individuals being supported and employees working in a Bed Based Reablement setting.  Individuals refers to all users of the bed based reablement services (day services, respite and reablement).