Document Library A to Z


Documents beginning with the letter 'H'

This Habitat Action Plan has been prepared through consuktation with a range of organisations and specialists within the Isle of Wight BAP partnership. It was first produced in 2002 and reviewed on 2008. Heathland and Acid grassland have both been identified as priority habitats in the UK Biodiversity Action Plan. Because the extent of true lowland heath is restricted on the Island and because these two habitats tend to occur in close association and are subject to similar threats and conservation requirements, they have been combined within this single Habitat Action Plan for the Isle of Wight. The Action Plan seeks to ensure that national objectives for these two habitats are translated into effective action on the Island, taking into account local issues.

 

This manual has been produced with the concept of providing Isle of Wight Council managers, supervisors and other persons with an interest in health and safety, with a source of reference, which will assist them in managing health and safety and enable them to formulate and develop their own in-house safety documentation. It will also ensure that they have access to all the corporate policies and are fully aware of the health and safety management structure and systems for compliance with legislation, which are in operation within the Council.

Although it is now illegal to use asbestos in the construction or refurbishment of any premises, many asbestos containing materials which were used in the past remain in place. It is reassuring that as long as such materials are in good condition and not disturbed or damaged there is no risk and need not be removed. They can, however, become a danger to health if disturbance or damage allows asbestos fibres to be released into the air where people can breathe them in.

 

The Management of Health and Safety Regulations 1999 require employers to have in place procedures for serious or imminent danger, these procedures will need to take into account the risk of staff being endangered by explosive devices or incendiary devices. The procedures to be followed in the event of a bomb threat should be clearly set out in workplace health and safety policy documents.

 Any area of work, be it plant or building, or any items of equipment which is considered dangerous by an employee should, in the first instance, be reported to his or her immediate supervisor.
If the supervisor is not available, the employee must notify the hazard to the responsible officer for his or her workplace.
After taking the action outlined above, should any employee remain dissatisfied with the action taken by the supervisor or the senior officer he or she may request that the matter be referred to the Health and Safety Section for an opinion. At this stage in the proceedings the employee may also, if he or she so wishes, seek the support of the Trade Union.

 

The purpose of induction is to introduce new employees to their job and the service for which they work. The sooner the newcomer becomes fully integrated, the quicker they will adapt to their working environment and be able to respond to the demands of the job and their responsibilities.

 

There is specific legislation concerning the use and maintenance of lifting equipment. The Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations (LOLER) 1998 set out a standard to be reached to ensure that lifting operations are carried out in safe manner. It is important that when addressing the requirements of LOLER that the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations (PUWER) (Section 2.37) are also considered. The text printed in bold italics indicates an Approved Code of Practice has been issued for that regulation and managers must ensure they comply with it.

The Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992 lay down minimum requirements for securing the health and safety of employees who are required to undertake manual handling tasks at work. The extent of an employer’s duty is to avoid manual handling operations, which might involve risk of injury, but where this is not practicable to remove or reduce the risk using risk assessment as a basis for action. In addition to the above, other legislation which is applicable to manual handling includes the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, the Management of Health and Safety Regulations 1999, and the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998.

This policy should be read in conjunction with the Isle of Wight Council General Health and Safety Policy statement, any Directorate policies and the Health and Safety Training Policy. In order to reduce the number of injuries being sustained by employees and to further managers in complying with the many statutory requirements and associated codes of practice and guidance, this policy has been formally adopted by the Isle of Wight Council.

The Work at Height Regulations 2005 came into effect on the 6 April 2005. The Regulations will apply to all work at height where there is a risk of a fall liable to cause personal injury. There are now no height limits. The Regulations place duties on employers, the self-employed, and any person that controls the work of others (for example Building Managers, Property Services and others who may contract others to work at height, such as window cleaners and builders). The Regulations do not apply to the provision of paid instruction or leadership in caving or climbing by way of sport, recreation, team building or similar activities.

There is a legal duty under the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 to ensure, as far as reasonably practicable, the health and safety of all employees whilst at work. Employers and employees also have a duty to ensure that others are not put at risk by work related driving activities. The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 also apply and require that risk assessment are undertaken for activities with significant risks, and that effective management controls are put in place and implemented. When considering driving safety there are a number of road traffic laws to take into account, including the Road Traffic Act. This policy details how managers should manage occupational driving and details responsibilities.

This study, carried out by Grontmij, shows heat demand density across the Island for both existing and proposed development. It suggests those areas where district heating could effectively be deployed in the future.

The Health and Wellbeing Strategy has been published for public consultation.
This is the inital EIA which will be completed in full following the completion of the consultation.

The Highways PFI Project Agreement main body has been published as nine (9) files:
1. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Contents Page
2. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part A to Part C
3. Highways PFI Project Agreement – Part D
3. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part E to Part G
4. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part H to Part J
5. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part K to Part M
6. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part N to Part O
7. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part P
8. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part Q

The Highways PFI Project Agreement main body has been published as nine (9) files:
1. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Contents Page
2. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part A to Part C
3. Highways PFI Project Agreement – Part D
3. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part E to Part G
4. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part H to Part J
5. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part K to Part M
6. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part N to Part O
7. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part P
8. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part Q

The Highways PFI Project Agreement main body has been published as nine (9) files:
1. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Contents Page
2. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part A to Part C
3. Highways PFI Project Agreement – Part D
3. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part E to Part G
4. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part H to Part J
5. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part K to Part M
6. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part N to Part O
7. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part P
8. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part Q

The Highways PFI Project Agreement main body has been published as nine (9) files:
1. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Contents Page
2. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part A to Part C
3. Highways PFI Project Agreement – Part D
3. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part E to Part G
4. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part H to Part J
5. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part K to Part M
6. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part N to Part O
7. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part P
8. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part Q

The Highways PFI Project Agreement main body has been published as nine (9) files:
1. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Contents Page
2. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part A to Part C
3. Highways PFI Project Agreement – Part D
3. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part E to Part G
4. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part H to Part J
5. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part K to Part M
6. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part N to Part O
7. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part P
8. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part Q

The Highways PFI Project Agreement main body has been published as nine (9) files:
1. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Contents Page
2. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part A to Part C
3. Highways PFI Project Agreement – Part D
3. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part E to Part G
4. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part H to Part J
5. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part K to Part M
6. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part N to Part O
7. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part P
8. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part Q

The Highways PFI Project Agreement main body has been published as nine (9) files:
1. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Contents Page
2. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part A to Part C
3. Highways PFI Project Agreement – Part D
3. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part E to Part G
4. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part H to Part J
5. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part K to Part M
6. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part N to Part O
7. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part P
8. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part Q

The Highways PFI Project Agreement main body has been published as nine (9) files:
1. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Contents Page
2. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part A to Part C
3. Highways PFI Project Agreement – Part D
3. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part E to Part G
4. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part H to Part J
5. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part K to Part M
6. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part N to Part O
7. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part P
8. Highways PFI Project Agreement - Part Q

Highways PFI Project Agreement - Schedule 1 Definitions,  defines the words and expressions used in the Highways PFI Prioject Agreement.

Highways PFI Project Agreement - Schedule 4
This Schedule is the Payment Mechanism

Highways PFI Project Agreement - Schedule 18
This document details Accurals and De-accurals

Highways PFI Project Agreement - Schedule 9
This document referes to Geotechnical and Geological Zones

Highways PFI Project Agreement - Schedule 13
This document refers to Call-Off Services

Highways PFI Project Agreement - Schedule 2 Output Specification
This document details the specification for the Highways Services included in the Highways PFI

Highways PFI Project Agreement - List of Entirely Redacted Documents

This document lists all annexures and schedules that have been redacted in their entirety

This is this Highways PFI Contract Mangement Team portion of the PFI Roadshow delivered across the Island between November 12 and January 13.

This is this Island Roads portion of the PFI Roadshow delivered across the Island between November 12 and January 13.

The aim of the Section’s work is to raise the standard of private sector housing conditions, improving home safety, bring empty properties back into use and to intervene where private drainage is causing a nuisance. In doing so, the Section helps to achieve the vision of the Authority which is “a progressive island built on economic success, high standards and aspirations and a better quality of life for all”, as well as the following Council Corporate Objectives: -

· Driving the sustainable regeneration and development of the Island

· Improving the health and well-being of Island communities

· Creating safer and stronger communities

· Improving outcomes for children and young people

· A high performing cost effective Council

One method by which the Housing Renewal Section achieves this aim is by the appropriate use of enforcement. Enforcement action can be taken against landlords and owner-occupiers alike.

The Housing Renewal Section carries out enforcement intervention by responding both reactively and proactively.

This document sets out the policy for residents wishing to obtain assistance with their household waste and recycling collections

Healthwatch will be the new independent consumer champion for both health and social care issues.

The aims and objectives of Healthwatch are twofold:-

  1. To provide a voice for local service users and carers in the commissioning of services and in doing so champion equality of health and care access and provision.
  2. To meet the requirements of the Health and Social Care Act 2012

Policy for schools to follow when organising educational visits.  This is to ensure that schools meet both health and safety requirements but also meet the expectations of the Council's insurers.  This version includes extra detail from our insurers regarding overseas travel.

Hampshire and Isle of Wight Devolution Prospectus, submitted to government as part of the devolution deal bid on 4 September 2015.

This policy outlines the Council's approach to health and safety in regards to new and expectant mothers. This policy should be read in conjunction with the Council's general maternity policy.

 

A list of amounts deducted from Housing Benefit based on a non-dependant's income

Schedule of the dates when Housing Benefit payments are paid to customers

Health and wellbeing strategy for the Isle of Wight 2018-2021

This strategy builds on the aim of the council’s corporate plan to move towards one public service by

developing joint commissioning across council departments and the wider NHS, regeneration and

environmental system, and in doing so to start looking beyond integration itself to the outcomes it

produces to improve the wider determinants of health and wellbeing.

Our Island Health and Wellbeing Strategy sets out a shared vision in which people live healthy and independent lives, supported by thriving and connected communities with timely and easy access to high-quality and integrated public services when they need them.

This strategy sets out sets out the key local priorities and a shared vision using a ‘life course’ approach for improving health and wellbeing on the Island.

Information relating to historical buildings and fuel and power

Health and Safety Policy Statement signed 25/01/2021 by John Metcalfe - Chief Executive - Isle of Wight Council.

All Council premises, where the Council is the employer, are required by law to display the Health and Safety Policy Statement. This statement is reviewed annually.

It is the responsibility of managers or Premises Liaison Officers (PLO's) at each premises to ensure that up to date copies of the policy statement are displayed on a notice board where it can be easily seen and read. Only one policy statement needs to be on display per premises. Generally, this will be displayed next to the health and safety law poster.

Home to School Transport Policy for statutory responsibilities to provide transport to eligible students attending school from their home address

2-page A4 PDF posters for display in public places. 

Hand cleaning techniques: How to handwash with soap and water and Hand cleaning techniques: How to handrub with alcohol handrub

Derived from WHO original. 

This document contains guidelines to assist customers completing a form for Discretionary Relief on the grounds of Hardship Section 49, of the Local Government Finance Act 1988.

The identification of hazards and the assessment of risks are key parts of the Isle of Wight Council’s policy for securing good standards of health and safety and a statutory requirement under the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999. Risk assessment will be carried out on an ongoing basis and to be effective it is important that all council employees understand and co-operate, wherever they can, in the process of risk assessment.

The purpose of risk assessment is to find out if the council is managing health and safety effectively and to see if improvements can be made. The assessments will cover the tasks undertaken by staff, procedures, plant, substances and workplaces.

Local housing authorities are required to formulate and publish a strategy for tackling and preventing homelessness at least every five years. This strategy has been developed following a review of homelessness on the Isle of Wight.